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Alan Carroll Media

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Media Discourse and Analysis

Paxman Interview

For this week’s class, we had to analyse the content of the above interview to determine whether or not there is any bias on the interviewer’s part.

Is the interviewer maintaining a stance of ‘formal neutrality’ or can we see some form of bias?

I think that, for the most part, Paxman maintains a stance of formal neutrality. His questions simply ask for Howard’s comment on what is already out there. The only place where I feel his true opinions come through is when he uses the phrase ‘wouldn’t a reasonable person conclude

How are the questions being answered by the interviewee(regarding language being used, is it conventional)?

At the start of the interview, I feel that he comes across as slightly defensive. Right away, he veers off from answering the question onto a statement that none of this came from his campaign. On the other hand, he also starts off very well in that he chooses his words very carefully and seems well-rehearsed but not necessarily to the point that he seems disingenuous. He is experienced in public speaking.

Once Paxman begins laying into him, though, Howard’s composure begins to slip. His tone of voice shifts to a more intense tone and he struggles to maintain control of the interview.

Has the interviewee answered the specific question that has been asked?

Howard does answer most of the questions put to him but, when Paxman lures him into the trap regarding making false statements, he begins to deflect the questions and when Paxman repeats the question about threatening to overrule Derek Lewis, he continually reframes the question to say what he was not entitled to do and not what he actually did.

What approach is the interviewee using, if any, to avoid providing an answer to a specific question?

Howard reframes the question to be about what he was or was not entitled to do and not about what he did do as Paxman was asking.

Is the interviewer allowing this to happen (violation) or are they pushing for an answer to a question?

Paxman repeats the question about sixteen times with Howard refusing to answer. However, by refusing to answer the question directly, he has answered. It becomes obvious to the viewer that Howard did indeed threaten to overrule Lewis.

Can we see the use of language within the interview being influenced by the perceived social context of the ‘target audience’?

This interview was originally broadcast on BBCs Newsnight programme. The target audience for this show is well educated and aware of the political landscape. The language used is clear and, to an extent, formal.

 

CA1 – Circuit of Culture

As part of my Media Discourse and Analysis module, I need to watch and discuss a piece of news and analyse it’s preferred meaning. To do this, I will use the ‘circuit of culture’ model of media analysis. This consists of five aspects; Representation, Identity, Production, Consumption and Regulation.

The piece I have chosen to analyse is BBC Newsnight’s report detailing the impact of tightening border controls across Europe in response to the Refugee Crisis.

Representation
The footage is narrated throughout The piece opens with footage of a crowd of refugees chanting in protest outside of a metal fence. The footage is shot from the other side of the fence giving the impression that these people are outsiders looking to get in.

Next, there is a clip featuring an interview with Andrew Bett, Director of the Refugee Study Centre in Oxford, where he describes how certain routes have been closed off to refugees.

Then there is a graphic comparing the numbers of migrants in 2015 (1,000,000) to the first ten months of 2016 (341,000). The map then focuses on the Greek/Balkan route which the narrator calls the ‘main route’ and states the number that has crossed this route since the route closed (200,000). The narrator then points out the other routes used using drawn on arrows on the map.

Next, we see crowded ships full of refugees, highlighting the sheer number of people this affects. We then cut to a video conference interview with Leonard Doyle of the International Organization for Migration, who describes the legal issues that the refugees can encounter, which include being exploited for cheap labour.

The last section of the report features criticisms of Europe’s response to the crisis, with 6,243 having been successfully relocated within Europe, falling far short of the promised 160.000 figure.

Identity
The report was produced by the BBC which is Britain’s state-funded broadcaster.

Production

The language used throughout the report serves to dissociate the viewer from the human impact of the crisis. What is immediately apparent is the BBCs use of the word ‘migrant’ to describe these people. The BBC has come under criticism for the use of this term instead of the term ‘refugee’, which is the preferred term in use by the UNHCR.

The footage used of ‘migrants’ seen behind police patrolled wire fences, creates a barrier between them and the viewer. The narrator makes a reference to the migrant issue being ‘successfully contained’. This phrasing brings to mind the kind of language used to describe the effects of a natural disaster, such as a wildfire, rather than when dealing with actual people.

The segment featuring the map and the routes used by refugees brings to mind a post-game analysis of a football match. I feel that this somehow trivialises the issue and perhaps the use of smoother graphics would be more appropriate.

The final segment featuring the criticisms of Europe’s response to the crisis could be seen as a pro-Brexit piece, painting Europe as a poorly-run organisation who doesn’t keep its promises.

Consumption
The video was uploaded to BBC Newsnight’s official Youtube channel on October 25th, 2016. Newsnight is the BBCs top current affairs programme and is broadcast every weeknight, typically at 10.30p.m.

Regulation
The BBC would be under the regulation of the national broadcasting standards agency, Ofcom and their own governing body, the BBC Trust.

Bibliography
BBC – Governance framework – BBC Trust. (2017). [online] Bbc.co.uk. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/governance/governance_framework.html [Accessed 20 Feb. 2017].

BBC regulation. (2017). [online] Ofcom. Available at: https://www.ofcom.org.uk/consultations-and-statements/ofcom-and-the-bbc [Accessed 20 Feb. 2017].

Du Gay, P., Hall, S., Janes, L., Madsen, A.K., Mackay, H. and Negus, K., 2013. Doing cultural studies: The story of the Sony Walkman. Sage.

Refugees, U. (2017). UNHCR viewpoint: ‘Refugee’ or ‘migrant’ – Which is right?. [online] UNHCR. Available at: http://www.unhcr.org/55df0e556.html [Accessed 20 Feb. 2017].

Request BBC use the correct term Refugee Crisis instead of Migrant Crisis. (2017). [online] Change.org. Available at: https://www.change.org/p/request-bbc-use-the-correct-term-refugee-crisis-instead-of-migrant-crisis [Accessed 20 Feb. 2017].

What’s happening with the migrant crisis? – BBC Newsnight. (2017). [online] YouTube. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuTMs23H-mo [Accessed 20 Feb. 2017].

Reality

According to Google, the definition of reality is “the state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them.” This definition speaks to the topic of our class. How do we define reality? How do we know that what we see with our own eyes is what is really happening? Some scientists have even debated the notion that our entire universe is a computer simulation.

On a much smaller scale, the media is what stands between us and the rest of the world. In this hyper-connected world, our perception of the  As such, it is their duty to present the world as it is and not to

According to Boorstin (1963), how the media presents us with information can be categorised into three types of events.

Genuine events: These are events that would happen whether the media reported on them or not. For instance, traffic accidents and natural disasters are genuine events.

Media events: These are events that have been interpreted and re-presented to the audience in a way that incites a certain response in the viewer. For instance, natural disasters are genuine events but how the disaster is framed by news outlets are media events.

Pseudo events: These are events that have been orchestrated by the media for the purpose of promotion. For instance, press conferences are organised through media organisations with the intent to gain press coverage for an event or product.

Astronomy, S. (2016). Is the Universe a Simulation? Scientists Debate. [online] Space.com. Available at: http://www.space.com/32543-universe-a-simulation-asimov-debate.html.

Boorstin, D. (1963). The image, or, What happened to the American dream. 1st ed. Harmodsworth: Penguin.

Garber, M. (2016). How Americans Put Reality on Life Support. [online] The Atlantic. Available at: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/12/the-image-in-the-age-of-pseudo-reality/509135/.

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